Are Murder, Rape And Slavery Evil?

Do good and bad really exist?

Until very recently there was no rape in Polynesia and the concept of prostitution was an alien idea, but that has changed due to its increased contact with the West.

Many people are familiar with the book, The Lord of the Flies in which Nobel Prize-winning author William Golding describes how a culture created by man fails, and it deeply explores human nature and individual welfare versus the common good.

Thinking about these things caused me to wonder if such things such as murder, rape and slavery etc are objectively evil, or do we just interpret them as evil?

 

This entry was posted in death, jealousy, Law, Misconceptions, prostitution, Relationships, religion. Bookmark the permalink.

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3 Responses to Are Murder, Rape And Slavery Evil?

  1. knopfman says:

    There is a school of thought that holds that no person is evil, and that only their acts may be properly considered evil.

    The psychologist and mediator Marshall Rosenberg claims that the root of violence is the very concept of “evil” or “badness”.

    Rosenberg makes the case that when we label someone as bad or evil, it invokes the desire to punish or inflict pain and also makes it easy for us to turn off our feelings towards the person we are harming.

    He cites the use of language in Nazi Germany as being a key to how the German people were able to do things to other human beings that they would not normally have been able to do, and he links the concept of evil to our judicial system, which seeks to create justice via punishment, “punitive justice”, punishing acts that are seen as bad or wrong.

    He contrasts this approach with what he found in cultures where the idea of evil was non-existent.

    In such cultures, when someone harmed another person, they were simply believed to be out of harmony with themselves and their community, were seen as sick or ill and measures were taken to restore them to a sense of harmonious relations with themselves and with others.

  2. divka says:

    “What is evil?

    Killing is evil, lying is evil, slandering is evil, abuse is evil, gossip is evil: envy is evil, hatred is evil, to cling to false doctrine is evil; all these things are evil.

    And what is the root of evil?

    Desire is the root of evil, illusion is the root of evil.”

    Buddha – 563-483 B.C.

  3. big-believer says:

    What Is Evil?

    Plato argued that evil is simply the absence of good that everyone desires.

    The duality theory claims that evil cannot exist without good, and that good cannot exist without evil, as they are the exact opposite states.

    In certain religious traditions, evil is personified as Satan who is the leader of the falling angels and is the ultimate adversary of God and humanity.

    So what is this malicious force that temps human souls and causes so much harm and suffering?

    Evil exists in a realm where souls choose to turn away from conscience, acting out solely to obtain pleasure or to intentionally cause harm.

    These malicious acts not only destruct the perpetrator, but they also injure all those around him or her and in a religious context, evil is consciously choosing to conduct sinful acts while turning away from graceof the Divine.

    Human spirits are innately aware of their desires for “good”, and when one acts against his or her conscience, internal dialogs of distress surface.

    Many people choose to pay attention to these “internal dialogs”, and they change their course of actions for the better, but others unfortunately choose to disregard the warning signs of danger and continuously take on the path of self-destruction as well as the devastation of others.

    What are the reasons that lead to one’s choice in conducting evil acts?

    Pain is an undeniable factor.

    Pain is an inevitable aspect of human journey.

    Pain can also be constructive, as in the process of dealing with our pain, we engage in the positive development of human psyche.

    Unfortunately, many souls shy away from the necessary anguish of human experiences and they actively seek for short-term pleasure and intensely avoid pain but when one runs away from pain, from facing life openly, actions of evil set in.

    A good example might the devastating effects of addictions as we often observe where one disregards the welfare of oneself and others in pursuing self-gratification.

    Regardless of the cause however, one has the choice and the responsibility over his or her actions and the beauty of human existence is the freedom of choice.

    However, this gift also bears immense responsibility and consequences and one of the greatest challenges of the human psyche is to choose between good and evil, the force of growth or the force of destruction.

    Human existence is filled with challenges and constant decisions and in carefully choosing each step of our path, we determine the future evolution of our soul.